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July 22, 2024

Fine dining restaurants with the most instagrammable interiors

Schenelle Dsouza  
Earlier, it was the consensus that picking a good restaurant was solely dependent on the cuisine because good food equals a good restaurant. And while that may be true, food is no longer the only aspect that defines a dining-out experience. The interiors and design of a restaurant have become an important factor for many, given that they can alleviate one’s dining experience.  
Walking through the doors, the first thing one notices when they enter a restaurant is the ambience – the lighting, décor, seating design, prominent statement structures and elements. All of these have been said to affect a customer’s mood when entering the space and can often be one of the defining factors on their return to the same restaurant. Innovative design with interiors that become a talking point is among the top priorities for restaurant owners. It is also a major aspect that can affect the success rate of the restaurant.  
When it comes to creativity in design, restaurateurs tend to pick a theme, be it glamorous or retro-chic. Some look to specific destinations for inspiration, which is among the top trends today. Other prominent elements like a distinguished colour palette and complementary décor further establish the theme and design of the space.  
Akina, Mumbai 
Akina
Photo Courtesy: Akina
A new Japanese fine dining space in Mumbai, Akina’s glam maximalist interiors are a standing highlight of the restaurant, aside from its delectable menu, of course. While the restaurant manages to bring in the best of Japanese tradition and heritage to the food, it does the same with the design sensibilities that influence the space. In Japan, design is characterised by organic forms that represent nature with tons of geometric shapes. Bringing in parts of these traditional elements, Akina showcases an organic yet contemporary space with a modern design inspired by traditional Japanese roots. 
Akina
Photo Courtesy: Akina
Bold red hues outline the entirety of the 5,000 sq. ft. restaurant; Japanese spring flowers are the main motifs highlighted throughout the restaurant. The bar in Akina takes on a regal red, black and gold theme with a minimalist curved back-lit onyx, inspired by the traditional Shoji screens illuminating traditional homes in Japan. Dubai-based F&B Entrepreneur Ryan SNR who partnered with Hitesh Keswani for the restaurant wanted to support the Indian local artisan community as well while building the place. And so, the restaurant uses a substantial portion of the dinnerware and crockery made by local artisans in India as well as Japan. 
Akina
Photo Courtesy: Akina
A fun new addition to the already glamorous restaurant is the luxurious underground speakeasy lounge called Prive by Akina. Envisioned to be an oasis of warmth, mystery and magic, Prive is enveloped in a lush jewel blue velvet and suede with a striking Koi Pond water ripple ceiling. With its regal tones and lush décor, Prive is the ideal spot for a sit-down session post a memorable meal at Akina.  
Bar Palladio, Jaipur 
Bar Palladio
Photo Courtesy: Bar Palladio
Jaipur’s Bar Palladio, with its striking blue interiors, is the perfect contrast to the beautiful pink city of India. The restaurant is an ode to Italian style and cuisine that takes inspiration from the iconic Caffé Florian and Harry’s Bar in Venice while maintaining key motifs from Mughal design. The name comes from the Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio. 
Bar Palladio
Photo Courtesy: Bar Palladio
The restaurant itself is located within the historic Narain Niwas Palace Hotel. Dutch designer Marie-Anne Oudejans conceptualized Bar Palladio as a maharaja’s palace from the 1960s. She combines both Italian and Indian design sensibilities with a royal shade of blue hue splashed against calming white tones for a bold but elegant look. Wandering peacocks, mature mango trees, and a garden of tented canopies dictate an orientalist fantasy, inspired by olden-day Mughal architecture. The restaurant has multiple sections including two private dining areas, a sheltered patio, and an open area with several tented canopies and small campfires.
Bar Palladio
Photo Courtesy: Bar Palladio
The bar area is one of the most impressive sections, characterised by the region’s tradition of wall paintings hand-painted by artist Vikas Soni. Additionally, a collection of brilliant neon colours breathes new life into the art of block printing that adorns the linen at this gentleman’s bar. 
Ditas, Mumbai
Ditas
Photo Courtesy: Ditas
A popular hot spot in Delhi, Ditas graced Mumbai with a retro-glam space that was set to leave a lasting effect. From the moment you step in, you’re transported to a different realm, one that is defined by glamour with a touch of minimalism. Minimal European décor with retro-chic art nouveau-inspired interiors defines the entirety of Ditas. 
Ditas
Photo Courtesy: Ditas
The entire space is divided into two areas – a long-running patio and a central dining space. The patio is accentuated with wicker and cane chairs, along with patterned tiles that give it a café-like vibe, while the bar-dining area has the ideal, picture-perfect set-up for a fine dining experience. The state-of-the-art bar is paired with an onyx stone counter decorated with gold embellishments adding to the glitzy ambience. Each wall in the restaurant has a defining aspect. The bar area has a high mirrored arch display for the bar collection, while the adjacent walls on the left and right display a garden art wall and a collection of abstract paintings respectively.
Ditas
Photo Courtesy: Ditas
Lighting plays a very important role, and so Ditas incorporates a selection of disco balls and boho chandeliers for an eclectic theme to match the furniture. With Moroccan blue tiles, as a call back to their Delhi interiors, and electric mid-century furniture, the Soho living room style seating places you in a luxurious high-end lounge.  
Plum by Bent Chair, Delhi 
Plum by Bent Chair
Photo Courtesy: Plum by Bent Chair
If you’re a fan of all things quirky, then you’ll love Plum by Bent Chair’s eclectic, all out décor. Tons of colour, bold elements, vibrant décor and an elaborate mix of prints and patterns are some of the ways to define this lively space. In addition to its unique design scheme, Plum by Bent Chair also poses a one-of-a-kind experience with a retail restaurant format, allowing customers to enjoy a live interaction with Bent Chair’s vast product range while enjoying a delicious meal. Interestingly, Bent Chair’s flagship store has been incorporated right above this outlet as well. 
Plum by Bent Chair
Photo Courtesy: Plum by Bent Chair
One of the most instagrammable restaurants in India, Plum by Bent Chair gets its name from the striking plum hue that covers the walls and columns of the restaurant. This vibrant colour is then accentuated with Victorian artworks, mirrors, and pretty planters. Interestingly, every piece of décor and furniture displayed in the restaurant comes from Bent Chair’s extensive range and is available on the catalogue for sale.
Plum by Bent Chair
Photo Courtesy: Plum by Bent Chair
Elements like mirrors, crystals, gold-plated stainless steel, florals and fabric lights work together to create a replica of the Garden of Eden with chrome-plated grapes and tiny hummingbirds dancing in between. Like most restaurants, the bar is the highlight of the restaurant. The back of the bar combines innovative design with light-responsive wallpaper; panels on the bar front further adds artistic details with illustrations inspired by the works of Japanese artist, Miroco Machiko.    
Someplace Else, Mumbai 
Someplace Else
Photo Courtesy: Someplace Else
A celebrated pub and performance space in Kolkata, Someplace Else in Mumbai is a multiverse of art, entertainment and cuisine, blending the magic of Kolkata with a reimagined vibrance that defines the city of Mumbai. Designed by London-based design firm Project Orange, the key difference in the Mumbai outlet is its use of colour in a multitude – bold pattern, bright colours, and standout décor accentuate the Technicolor aesthetic of the space. 
Someplace Else
Photo Courtesy: Someplace Else
Stepping into the restaurant, the edgy bar is the first thing you notice. The double-sided bar is adorned with a padded orange front and accented with a number of hand-blown glass spheres in jewel tones of amethyst, ruby and sapphire, hanging about the bar top. When it comes to décor, Someplace Else has incorporated the best of it. Mushroom-shaped lighting structures hanging from the ceiling, vibrant wall furnishings, plush seating and best of all, the technicoloured timber surrounding the stage area. 
Someplace Else
Photo Courtesy: Someplace Else
The seating here is designed keeping in mind the live performances and acoustics. This means high bar stools, sofas and booths which create different settings for different moods. Along the glass wall behind the bar is a collection of vertical fins that create an optical illusion while providing a level of privacy for the diners. 
Tsuki, Pune 
Tsuki
Photo Courtesy: Tsuki
The dining space in Pune is defined by restaurants that are often too flashy or too boring. But Tsuki stands out from that definition. A pan-Asian restaurant located in Koregaon Park, Tsuki encapsulates the beauty of a Zen Garden, inspired by the tropical sights of Bali, with a rainforest like setting. Although a pan-Asian restaurant, the owners wanted to stray away from typical Asian décor elements like black and red hues, and contemporary, western décor. And so, they opted for a natural ambience with characterised by ample of plants and greenery. 
Tsuki
Photo Courtesy: Tsuki
The name Tsuki means moonlit, and that was designer Keith Menon’s cue to give the place an open roof design with a skylight in the central section of the restaurant. Here, they fixed a collection of solar panels that power the entire restaurant. Since the restaurant was surrounded by plenty of natural greenery before designing, Menon decided to go for a garden theme, filling the interiors with amply of planters and foliage. This part was done in collaboration with Ugaoo, who executed the horticulture seen throughout the restaurant. 
Tsuki
Photo Courtesy: Tsuki
Keeping in line with the natural theme of the space, Menon opted for muted and minimal tones with rustic décor, and elements like wood, wicker and stone, to match the aesthetic. He wanted to ensure that all base colours of fabrics were neutral, so as to avoid any harsh elements. Sustainability is another important factor in the design philosophy of the restaurant. Not only is it fully solar powered but has also made extensive use of reclaimed teak and sheesham wood to create the furniture. 
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Schenelle Dsouza

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