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May 18, 2024

Image from Louis Vuitton Watch Prize website

The 5 unique finalists of the Louis Vuitton Watch Prize

In February this year, Raúl Pagès took home the Louis Vuitton Watch Prize for the RP1 – Régulateurà détente, a stunning wristwatch with a pivoted detent escapement.

Driven by a passion for watchmaking innovation and daring design, La Fabrique du Temps Louis Vuitton announced the Louis Vuitton Watch Prize for Independent Creatives. Through this initiative, La Fabrique du Temps Louis Vuitton intends to celebrate the creative talent, savoir-faire, and audacity of the independent watchmaking industry, to encourage artisans and entrepreneurs, and accompany future generations.

More than an award for watchmakers, the Louis Vuitton Watch Prize recognises bold visions and independent thinking. It honours those who challenge the present and defy the boundaries of time. Raúl Pagès did exactly that with Régulateurà détente, given that creating a pivoted detent escapement is a true feat for any watchmaker.

Although it was Pagès who ultimately impressed the jury (assisted a committee of experts) responsible for selecting the best watches in the competition, there were four other watches that made it to the final round alongside Régulateurà détente. Here is a peak into the four unique and stunning watches that made it to the final round of the Louis Vuitton Watch Prize!

Tischkalender Sympathique by Andreas Strehler

Image from Louis Vuitton Watch Prize website

This unique Swiss creation offers, in addition to conventional time of the day, a mechanical perpetual table calendar. The three faces of the time piece indicate the year, month, date, day of the week, and of course, the time.

 

L’Abeille Mécanique by John Mikaël Flaux

Image from Louis Vuitton Watch Prize website

This creation, hailing all the way from Bescançon, France, was intended to be a sculpture crafted through watchmaking to convey a powerful message about the endangerment of bees on the planet. Flaux wanted his watch to cultivate an expression on the beauty, complexity and fragility of life.

Chronographe Rattrapante by Petermann Bédat

Image from Louis Vuitton Watch Prize website

Yet another Swiss design, the Chronographe Rattrapante has its claim to fame firmly rooted in the distinctive architecture of its movement. Since chronographs often consist of so many intricate parts, one can no longer see what is underneath the surface of the watch. Petermann Bédat wanted a chronograph that could breathe, openly displaying as much of its innermost mechanisms as possible.

Chronomètre Artisans by Simon Brette

Image from Louis Vuitton Watch Prize website

 

This design is a three handed watch of extreme mechanical simplicity. Above all, what Brette wanted to see in his watch was volume; for it to have concave or convex surfaces. Such surfaces were important for him to truly demonstrate the excellence of watchmakers as craftspeople since curved surfaces in time-pieces are delicate and difficult to polish.

Zara Flavia Dmello

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